Tag Archive | "children"

Julia Preston reporting on the immigration crisis at the U.S. border with Mexico.

Critical Analysis: Mexican and Central American Children Seeking Refuge in U.S.

November 1, 2014


The United States has caught more than 68,000 children crossing the United States border—primarily via the Rio Grande Valley into Texas—in the past year, doubling last year’s number.
  The majority of children are coming from Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador.  In fact, less than a quarter of the children caught are from Mexico.  The increase of children from these Central American countries began in 2012.  Violence, family reunification, and poverty are the main reason for this surge.  For those children from Honduras, there is an especially strong correlation between the increase in children caught at the border with an increase in homicides.

Due to the William Wilberforce Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2008 (“TVPRA”), children from Central America have a longer before their deportation hearing than those children from contiguous countries (i.e. Canada and Mexico).  Unlike children from Mexico, a Border Patrol officer does not have the authority to make an on the spot determination as to whether a Central American child can stay in the country.

Julia Preston reporting on the immigration crisis at the U.S. border with Mexico.

Julia Preston has been reporting on the immigration crisis at the United States’ border with Mexico where Central American migrants are crossing. Photo and Caption Credit: Todd Heisler/The New York Times, http://www.nytimes.com/times-insider/2014/08/01/witnessing-the-border-crisis/?_r=1

The unequal treatment of children from Mexico versus children from Central America has draw criticism from both sides of the political isle leading to the President to take a strong stance on combatting this influx. In July, the President Obama White House urged an increase in funds—to the tune of just over $2 billion—to strengthen border security, expedite immigration case resolution, and deal directly with the humanitarian issues occurring in the countries of origin.  As with just about every policy and budgetary recommendation this White House has made, this recommendation was met with hostility both on the part of liberals and conservatives.

Liberals, on one hand, believe that the White House’s proposal upsets due process leaving thousands of children vulnerable.  Conservatives, on the other hand, believe this planned action is too little too late.  Regardless of your political stance on the issue, the larger underlying challenge is the United States’ role in this crisis and the potential responsibility it owes to mitigating its effect.

Honduras’s President Juan Orlando Hernandez has been quite vocal as to the United States’ hand in the immigration crisis.  The demand for drugs stemming from the United States has lead to an increase in violence and a decrease in roads for opportunity.  The illicit demand for drugs in the United States, no matter how frowned upon by the government and many citizens, has, in the opinion of many, has created a duty to address the humanitarian impacts.

The United States has the unique challenge of striking a balance between providing appropriate due process to those children who have made the journey to the United States, working with the immigrant’s countries of origin to address the underlying humanitarian issues, and corresponding the rate of deportation with the progress made in addressing humanitarian issues.  Perhaps easier said than done.

Alicia Guber is a 3L at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law and the Editor in Chief of the Denver Journal of International Law and Policy.

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Children of Syria

Lost Futures – The Children of Syria

As many, if not all of you, know, the conflict in Syria continues to rage on, affecting thousands in Syria and the surrounding areas. What started out as a desire to move towards democracy in a peaceful fashion has turned into a bloody and unrelenting war that only continues to get worse. In fact, the Syrian government has recently been accused of using chemical weapons in its attacks against rebels causing dire effects on the local population. However, amongst all the atrocities one tends to forget or overlook the most devastated victims of this two-year conflict: the Syrian children.

Children of Syria

The Children of Syria – In Dire Need of Help
(HuffPo)

During all times of war, children usually bear the brunt of the negative consequences. The conflict in Syria has been no exception. The Save the Children foundation recently released a report that claims nearly two million children in Syria are currently endangered by the ongoing conflict. More than 500,000 of those currently affected in Syria are under the age of 5. Access to basic healthcare and education has also been severely limited, threatening the futures of these children. Furthermore, dismal living conditions have led to widespread disease and hunger among these children without a steady source of help to turn to. With at least 1 of every 5 schools in Syria destroyed, homes in ruins, and shelters quickly filling to capacity, it is not hard to see that hope for these children and the situation in general is dwindling.

The consequences are not simply physical, either. The Save the Children report notes at least 3 in 4 children have experienced death of a close friend or relative, leading to startling psychological consequences, such as extreme withdrawn or aggressive behavior. Furthermore, these children are being forced to endure other atrocities such as sexual violence, torture, and forced recruitment into the armed forces. This is only antagonized by the fact that many of these children have been displaced from their homes, separated from their families, and forced to find refuge in neighboring countries. How can one expect these children to lead a decent, semi-normal life when they are constantly exposed to these horrors?

Many of the countries that are taking in these refugees are struggling with the task. Jordan, a refuge for more than a half million Syrians, has recently been forced to open up a second refugee camp in Mrajeeb al-Fhood as the influx of Syrian refugees into the country continues to grow everyday. This means it might be even more difficult for the refugees, especially children, to get access to basic resources. While Jordan is actually able to provide these refugees with shelter, other countries lack the resources to do so. Currently, there are no UN-funded refugee camps in Lebanon, where some 400,000 Syrian refugees have fled. Adding to their suffering, these refugees must fear for their relatives still living in Syria, as their act of leaving the war-torn country has put them at great risk of execution and torture by the government. Many children, who escaped to the safety of countries such as Egypt or Iraq, will most likely never see their families who are still trapped inside Syria again.

Not all hope is lost, however. The sobering realities described above have prompted generous action. Governments of various nations have pledged funds to help child refugees who have been forced into surrounding countries. Recently, the government of Japan contributed $1.5 million to the United Nation Children’s Fund (UNICEF) to help the child refugees in Iraq. This money will go to basic sanitation, healthcare and education services. Also, the Mrajeeb al-Fhood refugee camp mentioned above is funded by the United Arab Emirates. Furthermore, the UN itself has taken extraordinary measures to ensure that the Syrian child refugees receive basic amenities. The World Food Programme (WFP), a project recently launched by the UN, provides refugee children with meals that support good nutrition and health. Along with the meals, the WFP has also set up programs to encourage children to continue their education, though they are displaced and have suffered much hardship.

The aid currently being provided is a promising start to providing hope for these children. However, not enough is being done. While many countries are making valiant efforts to help these children, UNICEF warns that those currently trapped in Syria are in danger of becoming a “lost generation,” as there is a severe lack of funding. Key agencies and life-saving aid may have to be halted, leaving those children in and around Syria without any help. UNICEF notes that it might not be able to provide Syrian children and their families with clean drinking water in the near future. The conflict seems so far away in our minds; however, we must remember those who have lost their futures because of this senseless violence.

If you would like to donate to the cause of these children, please visit this link: http://www.unicef.org.uk/landing-pages/donate-syria/.

 Bailey Woods is a 2L and a Candidacy Editor on the Denver Journal of International Law & Policy

Posted in 1TVFA Posts, 2Featured Articles, Bailey Woods, DJILP StaffComments (0)


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